BC 1301 Harry Begay ring with “Water web” turquoise

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BC 1301 Harry Begay ring with “Water web” turquoise

$1,299.00

Navajo artist Harry Begay is one of only 2 artist we offer that creates his pieces with Sterling silver Ingot. This term “ingot” refers to the process in which how the silver is formed before it is made into its final shape ( ring, bracelet, necklace , ect.) It’s one of the oldest ways to craft Native American jewelry and truly a lost art.

This ring measures 1″3/8  in length with a width of 1″. The deep blue Kingman turquoise ring is 3/4″ x 5/8″. A true collectors piece

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Product Description

NAVAJO HANDCRAFTED RING BY ARTIST HARRY BEGAY


Kingman Turquoise

The Kingman mine in northwestern Arizona was one of the largest turquoise mines in North America. The terms “Kingman” or “high blue” refer to the blue color usually displayed in this stone. It has become a color standard in the industry. The mine became famous for its rounded, bright blue nuggets with black matrix. Few turquoise mines produced nuggets, especially of this quality. Old natural Kingman Turquoise is rare. The Colbaugh’s own this mine and the Turquoise Mountain mine, their company name is Colbough Processing. They have recently gone back into the section of the Kingman mine and are digging and bringing some new Natural Kingman Turquoise.


HARRY BEGAY

He began his jewelry making career in the early 1970s. He is widely recognized as reviving traditional Native American silver smithing by building a piece of jewelry out of ingot sterling silver. He heats the ingot and anneals it prior to hammering out the desired shape. He then pulls the wire to be used in the piece through an iron block with different sized holes to create different gauges. Harry’s work is significant in that the resulting piece is so thick and heavy that it could not have been purchased from sheet and wire at a commercial supply store. This process is so labor intensive that it takes many times longer to create a piece. It is for this reason that he only uses the finest turquoise on the market Harry’s contribution is so significant that he ranks as one of the most collectible Navajo silversmiths of the twentieth century.


Kingman Turquoise

The Kingman mine in northwestern Arizona was one of the largest turquoise mines in North America. The terms “Kingman” or “high blue” refer to the blue color usually displayed in this stone. It has become a color standard in the industry. The mine became famous for its rounded, bright blue nuggets with black matrix. Few turquoise mines produced nuggets, especially of this quality. Old natural Kingman Turquoise is rare. The Colbaugh’s own this mine and the Turquoise Mountain mine, their company name is Colbough Processing. They have recently gone back into the section of the Kingman mine and are digging and bringing some new Natural Kingman Turquoise.


 

INGOT SILVER:  silver is heated in a crucible with a torch until it is the right temperature, approximately 1850 degrees. Historically, temperature was judged by the color of the molten silver. That is still the most common method used even though many artisans now have access to crucibles with digitally controlled heat. Such fine control increases the chance for a successful pour. The temperature of the outside air must also be taken into consideration. If it is very cold, the silver can become too cool before it runs through the mold. When the silver is judged to be hot enough, it is poured into the mold which is the thickness the artist has chosen. At this point the silver is allowed to cool and block of silver is formed. From here the Silver can be hammered and shaped into any design the artist wants

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